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arrives in paris, the master who was already there, robert livingston who was approached, and he says essentially, how would you guys like to buy the entire territory of louisiana. livingston, it's not surprising, he said, yes, let's do this. they negotiate. the embassy arrives, complete the negotiation. >> host: that's james monroe. >> guest: who would become madison's secretary of state, and then would become madison's success sore as president. we have in the room a bunch of people almost who -- who would be president or almost president or thoroughly evaluated. they complete the negotiations. they are not difficult. the french want to sell. they have bigger problems than they have with the united states. they want the cash. >> host: louisiana was a white elephant. >> guest: they think that the united states gets louisiana. it's too far away, and they with too consumed to protect it. he says, amazingly, with the foresight that gives him the reputation for, you know, genius of mixed ethical quality, but remarkable intellectual abilities, a says a century from now, it could make them
a possibility so he lands in france and starts traveling towards paris and before he even arrives in paris, the american ambassador who is already there is napoleon's foreign minister and he says essentially how would you like to buy the entire territory? it's not surprising he said yes let's do this. they negotiate, complete the negotiation, they are -- i'm sorry, james monroe so who would become madison secretary of state and would then become madison's successor as president so we have in the room a bunch of people who would almost be president, or almost president so monroe and nixon complete these evaluations and they are not difficult. the french really want to sell and they want the cash. >> host: and louisiana they decided -- >> guest: napoleon things one way or the other. they are too to protect it. he says amazingly with a sort of foresight that gives him some reputation for the genius of the intellectual ability from a century from now that might make it so possible no one can stand up to them. so they take the purchase back to the news arrives in boston and its federalist terri
the atlantic and lands in france in search traveling towards paris and before he even arrives in paris, the american ambassador who was already there -- robert livingston's approach by talleyrand who is napoleon's foreign ministry and talleyrand comes to livingston says essentially how would you like to buy the entire territory of louisiana? livingston, he's not exactly surprising that livingston said yes, let's do this. they complete the negotiations negotiations -- i'm sorry, james monroe. who would become madison secretary of state and with them become madison's successor as president? we have your in the room a bunch of people who were almost, who would be president or almost president so monroe completes the negotiations. they are not typical. the french really want to sell. sell. they have bigger problems with britain and they want the cash. >> host: louisiana they have decided -- >> guest: one way or another, it's too far away and he says amazingly it was for sidekick is in this reputation for genius of mixed ethical quality. a century from now it might be so powerful that no on
by both president paris and president clip torn. >> stuart eizenstat, "the future of the jews." this is booktv on c-span2. >> tell us what you think about our programming this weekend. you can tweet us at booktv, comment on our facebook wall or send us an e-mail. booktv, nonfiction books every weekend on c-span2. >> so i, our book is science left behind, and it's about the rise of the anti-scientific left. we call it feel-good fallacies and the rise of the anti-scientist left. as ken said, my name's alex, and i've got my ph.d. in microbiology from washington. just a little bit about me, my background is entirely microbiology. a friend of mine said i look like an ubergeek in that picture, so i thought i'd put it up there. we grew all sorts of extremely smelly bacteria in that thing. i went to the university of washington in 2004, and i got my ph.d. in 2010 and immediately became editor of real clear science, so i've been in the real world for two years. so my personal science philosophy is rather straightforward and simple. if you're not an expert, it is best to accept what is
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4